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NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 1: A reveler catches confetti during the new year celebrations at Times Square on January 1, 2023 in New York City. People began celebrating New Year's Eve at Times Square in 1904, in 1907 the New Year's Eve Ball made its first descent from the flagpole at One Times Square. (Photo by David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)

Times Square before and after New Year’s Eve always reminds me of the greatest last call ever.  It’s like walking into a favorite nightclub or bar with your friends on Saturday night and everyone knows how epic the night is about to be.  Upon arrival, everyone gets right in and heads to the bar to order their favorite drinks.  The atmosphere is electric, the music is banging all night and everyone is waiting for that giant beat drop that will take the night to a new level.  At this point, your voice is horse and raspy from yell talking at your friends all night.  The music is starting to slow down a little.  Then, it happens.

At this point, a lot of people usually get the feeling that “last call” is about to be called.  What’s even worse are those fluorescent lights that follow shortly after.  I hate the buzz kill that “last call” lighting brings.  As soon as the lights come on you see hundreds of people in unflattering lighting slipping on napkins while chugging whatever is left in their cups.  You want to keep the party going, but you just know it’s probably best to go home.  And then, as soon as you wake up the next morning it happens.  The Sunday depression kicks in.  You look through the photos on your phone to grasp any moment you can from the previous night.  Alas, it’s time to move on and deal with the fact you may never have a night like that ever again.  The same goes for Times Square before and after New Year’s Eve.  Especially the after photos.  Someone recently shared some before and after footage of New Year’s Eve in NYC.  It’s as if someone called one giant last call.